July 31, 2017

Are Labels Wrong? 

A big, big thank you! On June 17, 2017, Redefined hosted a  medical career workshop.   We are especially proud and very thankful for the distinguished medical professionals,  speakers and to the participants  who attended. Some  crossed state lines to attend this event; we are humbled and grateful for their participation. We received the  survey results from  the participants who responded,  and  we are humbled by the  results: ​100% provided positive feedback (survey range 1 out of 10, 10 being the highest) on the  impact of the event.  Specifically, we received a 10 out of 10 in all measured areas including  professionalism of the speaker’s, engagement with the audience, and  children felt  inspired,  encouraged and  would be attending future events.  Moreover, we gained additional volunteers who  expressed interest in working with us advancing the mission and vision of Redefined.  We are  measured by our social impact.  Thanks to those who made the event powerful, impactful and  transformative!   On July 15, 2017,  we engaged in serving missionaries in a community service event. Currently, we are planning  future events designed strategically in the domains we seek to influence:  careers , confidence, community service and communication. This newsletter serves an additional purpose- as our first monthly newsletter, it is  intended to explain, in more detail,  our mission.  This newsletter is entitled “Are Stereotypes Wrong? “ Why are we  seeking to redefine labels?  Negative labels and stereotypes have an effect on perceptions which are  limiting.  According to an article published by sciencedaily.com, “ researchers did two experiments to  determine whether stereotype threat hindered boys’ academic performance. In one, involving 162  children ages 7 and 8, telling children that boys did worse than girls at school caused boys’  performance in a test of reading, writing, and math to decline (compared to a control group that got  no such information). In the other experiment, involving 184 children ages 6 to 9, telling children that  boys and girls were expected to do equally well caused boys’ performance on a scholastic aptitude  test to improve (compared to a control group). Girls’ performance wasn’t affected. “ Please feel free to  read the entire study (reference below) to gain a deeper appreciation  to engage your thinking.  This is  just one of many  empirical studies reflecting perceptions that inform attitudes.  I encourage you to  […]